How to Track Your Fertility

Tracking your fertility can help you pinpoint when you’re mostly likely to conceive. There’s a lot more to fertility than what can be captured in a single snapshot. That’s why consistently tracking your fertility is an important part of the conception process. Not only can it help you understand your body and your ovulation cycle better, but it can also improve the likelihood of a successful pregnancy — given that couples who have frequent intercourse during the ovulation period increase their chances of getting pregnant quickly. How to Track Your Fertility: The Basics During the 28-day menstrual cycle that most women experience, there are only six days during which it…

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COVID-19 and ART Treatments Update March 19, 2020

Due to the increasing impact of COVID-19, New York Reproductive Wellness (NYRW) will follow recent ASRM recommendations and suspend starting NEW treatment cycles as well as any elective procedures. For active patients who are currently in treatment, we will make every attempt to complete your treatment cycle in the coming days. Your NYRW care team will reach out to you to coordinate if they haven’t already. If you are experience any COVID-19 symptoms including fever or cough please call the office before attempting to visit. In the meantime, new patient consultations will be conducted via telemedicine only. If you are currently scheduled for a consultation or would like to schedule…

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Fertility Advice to Ignore — and What to Do Instead

There are a lot of common misconceptions about infertility — know how to tell the difference between harmful hearsay and helpful advice. If you and your partner are having trouble getting pregnant, you’re not the only ones. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, up to thirteen percent of couples experience fertility problems. As anyone experiencing infertility should be aware, there are plenty of misconceptions and superstitions surrounding pregnancy. If you’ve been trying for a baby with no success, you may start to believe some improbable pieces of advice. For an issue as important as this, you might figure even the craziest fertility schemes are worth a…

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Here’s What You Need to Know About Miscarriage

Miscarriages happen far more often than many people realize. Luckily, you can still have a healthy pregnancy after a miscarriage. Miscarriage is a subject that’s not often discussed, but it affects anywhere from 10 to 20 percent of known pregnancies. The actual number of miscarriages is likely even higher given that many miscarriages occur before a woman even realizes she’s pregnant. Miscarriage is defined as the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the 20th week. Most miscarriages occur because the fetus is not developing normally, not because of any issue in how it is being carried. It is important to keep in mind that most women who miscarry are able…

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June 2019 – Genetics in Medicine

Comparing ethnicity-based and expanded carrier screening methods at a single fertility center reveals significant differences in carrier rates and carrier couple rates June 2019 – Genetics in Medicine Expanded Carrier Screening (ECS) has become the standard of care for patients seeking fertility treatment over traditional ethnicity-based genetic screening panels. Due to the increased likelihood that individuals seek to become single parents, not knowing the genetic status of their donation partner, and the recent developments of cost-effective genomic technologies, genetic screenings have become increasingly accessible. New York Reproductive’s Dr. Avner Hershlag co-authors this study comparing the effectiveness ethnicity-based carrier screening and the newer expanded carrier screening to ensure a healthy, live…

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February 2019 – RBMO Paper

Choosing an expanded carrier screening panel: comparing two panels at a single fertility centre

February 2019 – RBMO Paper

Dr. Avner Hershlag investigates Carrier rates and carrier couple rates and their increases as expanded carrier screening panels (ECS panels) include more disorders and mutations. These rates, however, vary based on self-reported ethnicity. Preconception carrier screening of a diverse ethic population benefits from a more broadened and comprehensive expended carrier screening panel.

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What Is Ovarian Insufficiency and How Does It Impact Fertility?

Ovarian insufficiency is a condition that can affect women between the ages of 35 and 40, greatly reducing their chances of having a baby. Ovarian insufficiency, also known as premature ovarian failure, occurs when the follicles within the ovaries only sporadically release an egg. This condition greatly reduces a woman’s chances of achieving pregnancy. Ovarian insufficiency is sometimes mistaken for premature menopause, but there are distinct differences between the two conditions. Women who experience premature menopause stop having periods before age 40. By contrast, women with ovarian insufficiency menstruate occasionally, with irregular periods beginning between age 35 and 40. As a result, they may still be able to have a…

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December 2019 – Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

The potential impact of tumor suppressor genes on human gametogenesis: A case control study December 2019 – Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Do infertility patients have an increased risk to harbor cancer genes? Dr. Avner Hershlag, a world-renowned leader in the field, and his team, sought to answer this question. Their findings were just published by the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics. Indeed, several cancer genes were found in women with low egg reserve and in males with low or no sperm. Could cancer genes be the culprit in some cases of infertility? Do some infertile men and women have a higher chance to develop cancer? Further, larger…

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What Couples Need to Know About Secondary Infertility

After having a baby, many couples want to give their child a sibling and expand their family. Yet according to a 2013 National Health Statistics report, more than three million women of childbearing age have experienced secondary infertility. Secondary infertility is defined as the inability to achieve a pregnancy or carry a baby to term after the successful birth of one or more children. Secondary infertility often takes an emotional toll on a couple. They may keep trying to conceive without help, unaware there are treatments available to improve their chances of having a second or third child. But in order to successfully treat secondary infertility, it’s first important to…

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When Are Women Most Fertile?

Women trying to become pregnant can increase their chances by closely tracking their monthly cycle. Pinpointing the most fertile days of the month depends on identifying exactly when you are ovulating. Ovulation occurs when the ovary releases an egg, which then travels to the fallopian tube. If a couple has intercourse during this time, sperm can fertilize the egg, resulting in a pregnancy. Since women are at their most fertile for only five to six days a month, it’s important to track your menstrual cycle and plan intercourse around that brief window.  How to Track Ovulation Although each woman’s menstrual cycle varies, the average length counting from the first day…

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