June 2019 – Genetics in Medicine

Comparing ethnicity-based and expanded carrier screening methods at a single fertility center reveals significant differences in carrier rates and carrier couple rates June 2019 – Genetics in Medicine Expanded Carrier Screening (ECS) has become the standard of care for patients seeking fertility treatment over traditional ethnicity-based genetic screening panels. Due to the increased likelihood that individuals seek to become single parents, not knowing the genetic status of their donation partner, and the recent developments of cost-effective genomic technologies, genetic screenings have become increasingly accessible. New York Reproductive’s Dr. Avner Hershlag co-authors this study comparing the effectiveness ethnicity-based carrier screening and the newer expanded carrier screening to ensure a healthy, live…

February 2019 – RBMO Paper

Choosing an expanded carrier screening panel: comparing two panels at a single fertility centre

February 2019 – RBMO Paper

Dr. Avner Hershlag investigates Carrier rates and carrier couple rates and their increases as expanded carrier screening panels (ECS panels) include more disorders and mutations. These rates, however, vary based on self-reported ethnicity. Preconception carrier screening of a diverse ethic population benefits from a more broadened and comprehensive expended carrier screening panel.

Download PDF

What Is Ovarian Insufficiency and How Does It Impact Fertility?

Ovarian insufficiency is a condition that can affect women between the ages of 35 and 40, greatly reducing their chances of having a baby. Ovarian insufficiency, also known as premature ovarian failure, occurs when the follicles within the ovaries only sporadically release an egg. This condition greatly reduces a woman’s chances of achieving pregnancy. Ovarian insufficiency is sometimes mistaken for premature menopause, but there are distinct differences between the two conditions. Women who experience premature menopause stop having periods before age 40. By contrast, women with ovarian insufficiency menstruate occasionally, with irregular periods beginning between age 35 and 40. As a result, they may still be able to have a…

December 2019 – Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics

The potential impact of tumor suppressor genes on human gametogenesis: A case control study December 2019 – Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics Do infertility patients have an increased risk to harbor cancer genes? Dr. Avner Hershlag, a world-renowned leader in the field, and his team, sought to answer this question. Their findings were just published by the Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics. Indeed, several cancer genes were found in women with low egg reserve and in males with low or no sperm. Could cancer genes be the culprit in some cases of infertility? Do some infertile men and women have a higher chance to develop cancer? Further, larger…

What Couples Need to Know About Secondary Infertility

After having a baby, many couples want to give their child a sibling and expand their family. Yet according to a 2013 National Health Statistics report, more than three million women of childbearing age have experienced secondary infertility. Secondary infertility is defined as the inability to achieve a pregnancy or carry a baby to term after the successful birth of one or more children. Secondary infertility often takes an emotional toll on a couple. They may keep trying to conceive without help, unaware there are treatments available to improve their chances of having a second or third child. But in order to successfully treat secondary infertility, it’s first important to…

file.jpg

When Are Women Most Fertile?

Women trying to become pregnant can increase their chances by closely tracking their monthly cycle. Pinpointing the most fertile days of the month depends on identifying exactly when you are ovulating. Ovulation occurs when the ovary releases an egg, which then travels to the fallopian tube. If a couple has intercourse during this time, sperm can fertilize the egg, resulting in a pregnancy. Since women are at their most fertile for only five to six days a month, it’s important to track your menstrual cycle and plan intercourse around that brief window.  How to Track Ovulation Although each woman’s menstrual cycle varies, the average length counting from the first day…

file.jpg

The Connection Between Stress and Infertility

Stress affects so many aspects of our physical wellbeing, from our cardiovascular fitness to our mental health. But could stress also play a role in fertility? Several studies completed in the last decade show there may be a link. In 2010, researchers at the National Institutes of Health and the University of Oxford studied whether stress negatively impacted a woman’s ability to conceive. The researchers monitored the ovulation cycles of 274 English women aged 18 to 40 trying to become pregnant. Their stress levels were measured by the amount of alpha-amylase and cortisol in their saliva — both substances produced by the body in response to stress. Women with high…

file.jpg

Can an Ovarian Cyst Cause Infertility?

Many premenopausal women develop ovarian cysts that emerge during the ovulation cycle. These non-cancerous, fluid-filled sacs rarely cause symptoms and often disappear without treatment. Even so, if you’ve been diagnosed with an ovarian cyst, you may wonder whether it could impact your fertility.  Fortunately, unless the cysts are associated with another condition that affects fertility, an ovarian cyst will not interfere with your ability to become pregnant. For instance, cysts that develop due to endometriosis — an abnormal growth of uterine tissue outside of the womb — may produce endometriomas that could hinder fertility. Another condition, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS), leads to the formation of many small cysts on the…

file.jpg

How Effective Are Fertility Treatments?

According to the Department of Health and Human Services, 12 to 13 percent of couples experience infertility, which is defined as a failure to achieve a pregnancy after one year of trying. A third of infertility cases are attributed to women, while a third are linked to men. Another third may be due to both partners, or an exact cause is not determined. Fortunately, several assisted reproductive technology (ART) techniques can help couples conceive a child. Depending on the method used, success rates rise to nearly 50 percent.  Primary ART options include intrauterine insemination (IUI), in-vitro fertilization (IVF), and ovulation induction. Here’s what couples need to know about the effectiveness…

file.jpg

How to Boost Male Fertility

If you’re suffering from infertility, follow these four tips to increase your chances of pregnancy. Although female infertility is more often discussed, approximately one-third of all infertility cases can be attributed to male reproductive issues. Therefore, if a couple is unable to conceive after a year of trying, both partners should undergo fertility testing.  If a man is experiencing infertility, there are several ways to increase the chances of pregnancy. The first step is determining the underlying cause of infertility in order to best address the problem.  What Is Male Fertility Testing? Male fertility testing centers on three factors: sperm count, sperm quality, and sperm motility. The majority of male…