How You Can Use an Ovulation Calendar to Get Pregnant

Once you make a decision to start a family, you probably would like to conceive as soon as possible so that you and your partner can start to make your dreams become a reality. While some couples are willing to just let things take their natural course, other couples desire to maximize their chances of getting pregnant each and every month. Using an ovulation calendar is an excellent method to help you understand your most fertile days to help you maximize your opportunity of conceiving as early as possible. Here are a few ways you can use an ovulation calendar to help you to get pregnant. Understand your fertile cycle. Most…

ovulation calendar

How to Use an Ovulation Calendar

Some women seem to be able to conceive a pregnancy without really trying, while others have to work at it. If you are in the latter category, an ovulation calendar is one of the tools you may find helpful. The window for an egg to become fertilized is relatively narrow and an ovulation calendar can help pinpoint the best times for intercourse. At New York Reproductive Wellness, we recommend the use of ovulation calendars. How Ovulation Works    Ovulation is a normal part of the healthy menstrual cycle. Once a mature egg is released from the ovary it travels down the fallopian tubes into the uterus. In most cases, only…

Can an Ovulation Calendar Help You Get Pregnant?

What is an Ovulation Calendar? During normal menstruation, ovulation occurs when an ovary releases one mature egg. That egg must then travel down a fallopian tube and be fertilized by sperm. If the egg is not fertilized, the lining of the uterus is shed during menstruation.  Most women in their 20s and 30s have a menstrual cycle length of 28 to about 32 days, which can be interrupted by a variety of factors–illness, extreme weight gain or weight loss, stress or disease. During times of normal cycles, the ability for a woman to ovulate takes place somewhere in the middle of their cycle, usually between day 11 and day 21.…

Understanding the Ovulation Calendar Cycles

If you are trying to get pregnant, you will need to become familiar with your ovulation cycle as part of your fertility evaluation. You can do this by tracking ovulation and your fertile days each month with an ovulation calendar. Each month, you have about six fertile days in what is called your fertile window.  These are the days leading up to ovulation. Unfortunately, women often try to conceive based on a standard cycle, but if you ovulate early or late, you might miss it. In fact, only about 30 percent of women have their fertile window according to the clinical guidelines. This is why tracking your ovulation has become…

Natural Cycle IVF: Follow Your Own Ovulation Calendar

For patients who would rather do things more naturally or cannot tolerate a higher-risk procedure, natural cycle IVF may be the best choice. This option follows your own natural ovulation calendar and offers several potential advantages over a conventional IVF procedure. Below is some information about this procedure to help you determine if it’s the right option for you. What is Natural Cycle IVF? Natural cycle IVF is an in-vitro fertilization procedure that is similar to conventional IVF. However, unlike conventional IVF, natural cycle IVF does not utilize medications to stimulate the ovaries. Instead, it follows your natural ovulation calendar, allowing your body to produce eggs on its own and in…

Using an Ovulation Calendar

When you’re trying to conceive, timing matters and details count. That’s particularly true when it comes to ovulation, since the window for fertilization is narrow. An ovulation calendar is one of the basic tools for tracking your personal cycles, and something we recommend at New York Reproductive Wellness. All About Ovulation Once a month, your body releases a mature egg from the ovary. The egg travels down the fallopian tube and into the uterus. When you ovulate, the cervical fluid changes to a substance that looks like egg whites, and a slight increase in your body temperature also occurs. If it is not fertilized, the egg washes out with your…

How to Use an Ovulation Calendar

According to the American Pregnancy Association, women who have a 28 to 32 day menstrual cycle generally experience ovulation between day 11 and day 21 of their cycle. When you are ovulating, an ovarian follicle will discharge an ovum (egg). The ovum then travels down a fallopian tube where, if healthy sperm is present in that fallopian tube, the egg can be fertilized. The hypothalamus regulates ovulation by “telling” the pituitary gland and the brain’s anterior lobe to begin secreting follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). FSH is need to initiate egg development and increase estrogen levels. LH assists in egg maturation and also triggers ovulation as well as…